Tick Medicine

Tick Medicine

Are you willing to entertain the thought that tick bites aren't all bad? I would like to contribute some positivity to the conversation about ticks and stop all the fear mongering.

For some people, ticks are now almost synonymous with woods, nature, and the great outdoors. Have we forgotten that there are methods of prevention? I’ve read recent articles suggesting to “simply stay away from the woods.” How sad to encourage such fear!

We are not an indoor species and avoiding nature is not a solution.

We can take precautions without completely avoiding.  Dress wisely, use essential oils or other repellent, and check afterwards. Make a choice to enjoy the outdoors without anxiety and accept each experience as a way to learn something about yourself.

Whether we encounter an obstacle, an opportunity, or a tick bite, we have a choice: stay the same or learn something.

Sometimes the learning is heavy, and difficult to walk through. When our life or our body is out of balance in any direction, yoga and other philosophies suggest that the pendulum will eventually swing to that exact same opposite extreme in an effort to create balance. So a common example would be if your schedule is totally out of control and you are in a constant state of overdrive and stress and busyness, eventually, the universe will offer you an opportunity to heal. It might be a car accident, a job loss, or an illness, that gives your body a chance to shut things down for long enough to recoup and the lesson would be to (hopefully) reevaluate your priorities and slow down. Take it or leave it, and possibly re-learn the same lessons over and over again.

Learning lessons through the vehicle of the physical body is uncomfortable. But in order to actually grow, we must be brave enough to observe with objectivity. At the time, you may see the experience as negative, but had you avoided it in some way, you would not be who you are today. We will not grow on our spiritual path if we avoid life's lessons or live from a place of fear. Faith and fear are antonyms.

So what can we learn from receiving a tick bite? Lots of things, actually.

SpiritAnimals.com says, “The tick symbolizes the danger of inflating fears way out of proportion compared to risk. Like a tick, fear is also a parasite in a human life which sucks the entire life out and makes one feel empty.”

Ironic, right? Whether you end up sick or not, the very tick bite you fear so much offers a wake-up call.

Living from a place of fear affects every...single...aspect of our life.

Fear affects how deeply you allow yourself to feel. If you are afraid to feel fear itself, the act of avoiding that which scares you draws you further away from any sort of healing that might occur. Living from a place of faith doesn’t mean taking unnecessary risks; it just means choosing to fully live your life and embrace all that comes.

We must all learn how to not only accept what comes, but to be curious about it's usefulness for our spiritual journey. When we recognize every single occurrence as though it's happening FOR our spiritual development (rather than something bad happening TO us), we eventually develop profound appreciation for even things such as tick bites.

Is this an attitude you are willing to commit to? Can you help to spread THIS type of message instead of more negativity and fear? What challenges are you experiencing that might actually be your medicine? Share your thoughts with me.

How to use nature to combat stress

nature vs. stress : wholehearter

I feel like I blog a lot about stress, stress reduction and stress management. My intention is not to focus on the negative, but to simply call attention to the types of dysfunction that we can alter. Iyengar touches on why spiritual philosophies often tend to harp on the negative (grasping desires, weaknesses, faults, and imbalances). They are trying to find, examine, and eradicate the things that cause us suffering. It's so that we can understand what can go wrong, and why, and how to stop it.

Your body sends healthy or "good" stress signals when you are hungry, when you stub your big toe or when something is amiss in your body. For many people though, we also experience stress when we are in a conversation, waiting for something, or managing our to-do lists.

Stress is meant to be an informative red flag, but for many of us, it tends to be a constant subconscious state of arousal.

I like to think about the way that animals within nature live their lives. We can learn a lot from studying and observing the natural world around us. Here are a few lessons we might take from nature:

1) Animals do not exert any excess effort for survival. If an animal can function at 75% effort, they will not push any extra. As humans, we tend to over-exert and cause extra stress because we like to show off, people-please, or strive for perfection. Ultimately, this ego-driven lifestyle only causes us suffering.

2) Animals do not worry about the future. The gift of our developed mind has plagued us with habits of worrying, anticipating, excitement, and looking ahead. Although we do need to plan for the future, animals live moment to moment in the present, addressing one thing at a time.

3) Animals automatically shut off their stress signals. Observe the way that animals move and exist in their natural environment. When not in immediate danger, animals simply do not remain stressed. Our fight or flight response is meant to be useful, not habitual.

In addition to the lessons we can learn from animals, simply being within nature is therapeutic for many reasons. I was recently reading some of the diaries of Anne Frank and I loved that one of her favorite ways to de-stress was to spend time in nature.

“The best remedy for those who are afraid, lonely or unhappy is to go outside, somewhere where they can be quite alone with the heavens, nature and God. Because only then does one feel that all is as it should be and that God wishes to see people happy, amidst the simple beauty of nature. As long as this exists, and it certainly always will, I know that then there will always be comfort for every sorrow, whatever the circumstances may be. And I firmly believe that nature brings solace in all troubles.” ― Anne FrankThe Diary of a Young Girl

Sometimes, reading simple reflections like this really helps me to put my stress in perspective, so that's why I'm sharing it. If Anne Frank can cultivate peace through the beauty of nature, then it can certainly be of help to me.

Have you tried seeking out a quiet spot in nature to clear your head? It doesn't have to be a completely private and silent spot to have an effect, but you can observe any small microcosm. Whether it's sitting inside, looking at your backyard, heading to a park to sit in the woods or practicing yoga outside, natural beauty has a way of showing us it's intricate perfection and making us and our troubles feel smaller by comparison. And spring is a perfect time to try it! :)

Check out my events page for upcoming outdoor hikes and yoga practices!